SBE
Milwaukee Chapter 28
The Society of Broadcast Engineers
The Broadcast Newsletter
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June 2017
Volume 33 Number 6 

INFORMATION OF INTEREST TO THE 
MILWAUKEE AREA
BROADCAST ENGINEERING COMMUNITY 
PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY
CHAPTER 28, SOCIETY OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS 
THIS MONTH
 

General Discussion of the Chapter

Tuesday, June 20, 2017
6:00 pm

Please note the earlier starting time.
Come for Pizza Dinner

Entercom Communications Milwaukee
11800 W Grange Avenue

Hales Corners, Wi 53130
414-427-1966

(map)
(Street View)


We will be starting with a Pizza Dinner at 6 pm. Following dinner, we will have an open discussion.


Minutes of the meeting of Tue, May 16, 2017


Location:    Entercom Communications
Host:           Chris Tarr- Director of Engineering
Program:    NAB Review-Skype w/ Scott Fybush
Attendance: Total - 10 members (5 certified), 1 guest

The meeting was called to order by new Chapter Chair Chris Tarr at 6:18 pm.

Minutes from the last meeting were read and approved.  Treasurer Chuck Janzer updated the Chapter's financial status.
There was no updated news from Certification Chair Rick Ryan and it was noted that Rick had received a Plaque from the SBE for his 30 years of service to the SBE.

Frequency Coordinators Ron Pellegrini and Dave Janzer had mentioned requests for frequency coordination for the upcoming US Open to be held in Erin, Wisconsin in mid-June and across 5 bands using 5.6 and 7 GHz.  Under new business was discussion about the transition, in 10 phases, to the new allocated broadcast band frequencies and scheduled to end by October 2019.  This would involve changes of transmitters, antennas and possibly antenna lines due to band changes. 

For the evening's program, Chris implemented a SKYPE connection to Scott Fybush in Rochester, NY.
Scott went over a review of his attendance at NAB and discussed the time-line, costs, reimbursements and logistical transitions of TV to ATSC-3 conversion.  He also talked about audio processing and HD Radio.

For more information, contact Scott at: Fybush.com.

For Show and Tell, Chris brought in some old transmitter logs from 1954/55.  The logs were from then WEMP-FM, 93.3 MHz/50 KW and WEMP-AM
1340 KHz/250 W.

The meeting ended at 8:35 pm.

Respectfully submitted,

Tony Cutraro
Secretary
SBE Chapter 28, Milwaukee 

SBE Short Circuits
by John Poray

RICE-NESHAP Regulations
Apply to Broadcasters

May 11, 2017
By Mike Hendrickson, CPBE, CBNT
Are you familiar with the term RICE-NESHAP? You may have seen it in what you considered an annoying notice from a meaningless agency because you only have an "emergency" generator. If that was what you thought, you need to think again!

RICE-NESHAP is an acronym that translates to Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine and National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. In the context of the EPA rules it applies to any stationary internal combustion engine, whether an emergency generator, or a pump engine or other device powered by a stationary internal combustion engine.

The EPA first introduced these rules for engines in June 2004 and adopted the final rules in January 2013. If you have a stationary engine in use - emergency generator or not - you need to know these rules. Failure to comply can mean a fine for the engine owner.

First, understand that the EPA rules are the minimum requirements. There may be state, county, and local requirements that may be more stringent. Also, many of these agencies are much more aggressive with their enforcement than the federal EPA.

To know what federal, state, county, or local rules may apply, collect the following information: The date of manufacture or reconstruction (as defined by CFR title 40, part 63.2), the type of engine (spark ignition (SI) or compression ignition (SI), the size of the engine in brake horsepower, and any manufacturer certifications.

The rules contain regulations regarding record keeping. At a minimum you will need to keep track of the use of the engine and the maintenance it receives. The rules also specify limitations on the number of hours per year the engine may be run in non-emergency use or testing. Non-emergency use includes the use of the generator in load-shed programs.

I encourage every engineer with an emergency generator to become familiar with the rules. The specific rules are located at CFR title 40, part 63, subpart ZZZZ.

Online Resouces


SBE Names Three Members to Fellow
Frank Giardina, Ted Hand and Robert Hoffman
Earn the Honor
April 25, 2017
NAB Show, Las Vegas, NV - The Society of Broadcast Engineers (SBE) has elevated three members to the membership rank of Fellow. The SBE Board of Directors elected Frank Giardina, CPBE; Ted Hand, CPBE, 8-VSB, AMD, DRB; and Robert Hoffman, CPBE; at its meeting held Sunday, April 23 in Las Vegas during the 2017 NAB Show.

Frank GiardinaFrank Giardina is the director of engineering/IT for the Cumulus Media Birmingham, AL, market. His interest in electronics and radio began when he was a child when he started a radio repair shop in the family garage, where he worked on radios for relatives and friends. This eventually led to his first summer job in a local radio/TV repair shop. Frank obtained his amateur novice test at age 12, then his Technician License, and then his First Class Radiotelephone Operator License at 16. He currently holds an Extra Class license, WA4FG. His career includes working in Dallas as a component test technician at Rockwell-Collins before returning to Birmingham to work at stations including WAQY, WBRC-AM/FM, WSGN, WAPI-AM/FM, WZRR and WJOX. He is a past chair of SBE Chapter 68 Birmingham, and is currently frequency coordinator. He is an instructor in the Alabama Broadcasters Association’s Engineering Academy, teaching AM and FM transmission and reception.

Ted HandTed Hand is director of engineering/operations at WSOC-TV, Charlotte, NC, Cox Media Group. His TV career began at WTVZ and then WAVY in Norfolk, VA. He has also worked for Capitol Broadcasting in Raleigh, NC; and WTKR and then WGNT in Hampton Roads, VA. Ted has been active in SBE Chapter 54 Hampton Roads, VA, for many years, serving the chapter as webmaster, where his efforts were recognized in the SBE Awards program in 2004, 2005, 2007 and 2010. He is also active in SBE Chapter 45 Charlotte, NC. In 2016, both chapters honored Ted with their Chapter Engineering of the Year awards. Ted served 11 of 14 years on the SBE Board of Directors, with his last term ending in 2016. He was secretary for five of those years. He has served on the SBE's Executive Committee, and he has chaired the SBE Frequency Coordination Committee.

Robert Hoffman is the chief engineer of Hubbard Radio St. Louis and stations WIL-FM, WARH-FM and WXOS-FM. His first job in radio was the on-air producer for The Teen Show at WINI in Murphysboro, IL in 1971. He quickly became a morning and afternoon host, and operations and music director there. His radio career has taken him to stations in Mt Vernon, IL, and Cape Girardeau, MO, before he moved to St Louis in 1985, then moved away, and returned to St. Louis in 1992. He has worked for the same stations for more than 19 years, through which he has also worked for three owners. He is active in Chapter 55 St. Louis as the Meeting Coordination and Program Chair, a role he has filled since 1995.

In the nomination for Frank Giardina, one person wrote, "Frank's guidance, advice, extraordinary technical expertise, and insistence on perfection have helped me build six radio stations. He has also had great positive influence on many new engineers. His dedication and unwavering high standards are surely a reflection of what the SBE represents."

In Ted Hand's nomination, one endorser wrote, "I [have] had several opportunities to talk to Ted about broadcast engineering-related topics and the SBE, and found him to be a most talented and experienced broadcast engineer and committed to the goals of our society, the developing and advancement of the broadcast engineer." Another endorser wrote, "His is a great support to others in the industry and is always willing to impart his knowledge to those less experienced."

In Robert Hoffman's nomination, an endorser wrote, "Robert's biggest accomplishment is staying abreast of changes and technology of current radio." In addition, "Bob is always willing to help other people. At any time, anyone who calls him, Bob will go out of his way to help."

"Our newest Fellow members exhibit the outstanding qualities of outstanding broadcast engineers worthy of the Society's highest member grade," said Jerry Massey, CPBE, 8-VSB, AMD, DRB, CBNT, president of the Society of Broadcast Engineers. "Each has taken his own unique path to success in broadcast engineering, and I congratulate them on this recognition."

The Fellow honor is the highest membership level in the SBE. Members must have made significant contributions to the broadcast engineering field or the SBE. Candidates are nominated by their peers. Since the Society's founding more than 50 years ago, 75 members have been honored with the Fellow rank.

The three recipients will be recognized for their election to Fellow during the SBE National Awards Dinner on Oct. 26, 2017, in Denver, during the annual SBE National Meeting, which will be held in conjunction with the Rocky Mountain AV Expo.

EAS Security Notes
April 10, 2017
Prepared by the SBE EAS Advisory Group
Intrusions into computerized equipment have been around since the internet became a reality years ago. It is no surprise to broadcast engineers that these invasions have made their way into radio and television stations.

Most recently, EAS devices have been a major target. To comply with FCC rules, these devices must have internet access to receive information from FEMA via IPAWS.

Security for EAS and other station devices should be a high priority for station engineers. As a result, the SBE EAS Advisory group has put together a basic security guidelines summary to aid stations in assuring that all equipment is protected from these outside intrusions.

Summary

Every week, broadcasters like you are having their station equipment and computers hacked or tampered with by outsiders or malware infections that affect station computers and networks. If it hasn't happened to you yet, the odds are unfortunately high that it eventually will happen.

These types of intrusions are more than an inconvenience. It can cost you to repair the systems that were compromised. It can cost you revenue for lost airtime. It can cost you credibility in your audience and community. Moreover, it eventually will cost all of us if the government feels it necessary to step in with additional regulations and requirements on broadcasters.

At the same time, it's challenging for many broadcasters to keep up with the wide range of potential cyberattacks. Many broadcasters don't know they have become vulnerable to attackers until it's too late.

To help broadcasters address this growing concern, we have compiled some tips and best practices on how to keep your operation from falling prey to cybercrime. The bottom line:
• Know your Systems. Know what is connected to the network and the internet: at the office, studio, transmitter site, and remotes. If it's connected, it is at risk.
• Defend your Network. Anything that is connected to your network or the internet must be behind a firewall.
• Protect your Equipment. Change default passwords. Change default usernames. Regularly check for and install any software upgrades or patches for equipment.
• Use Common Sense with Email and the Internet. Be cautious about opening email attachments or downloading from websites you don't completely trust. Harmful malware can enter your station, and do significant damage to your business.

What is the problem?

Recent events had plainly shown that broadcasters are a low-hanging fruit for internet mischief-makers and cybercriminals. All too frequently, this involves key station equipment and computers left vulnerable to the internet, not changing default passwords, or even not having passwords at all.

The results have included the entire programming stream disrupted by IP streamers redirected to offensive, political and/or obscene content, the issuance of false or simulated EAS messages, the creation of fake messages and alerts via RDS encoders, the wholesale disruption of station operations when computers are locked via malware and viruses, and more. These are issues that have already happened, repeatedly.

In many cases, the threats boil down to simple vulnerabilities that could have been easily addressed beforehand.
• Stations with unconfigured firewalls - or even no firewalls.
• Station equipment left exposed and unprotected to the open internet.
• Station equipment left with default or easily guessable passwords – or even no passwords.
• Email attachments open, which introduced malware across the station network.

Presenting the potential for reaching a wide audience with inappropriate or political content, broadcasters present an irresistible opportunity for internet bad guys. Some broadcasters have opined that cybersecurity is too expensive or difficult. However, as we outline below, broadcasters can take preventative steps that are often a minimal expense – or no expense at all.

The technical solutions:

• Know Your Systems. Know what systems are connected to your network and to the internet, and know which systems should not be. If it is connected to the network, it's going to need to be protected. This applies to looking at your systems throughout your operation. This includes the business office, studios, transmitter sites, remote control points, and other remote sites.
• Firewalls to Defend Your Network. The one security item every company needs is a firewall, a security appliance that attaches to your network and acts as the protective shield between the outside world and your wired and/or wireless network. A firewall continuously inspects traffic and matches it against a set of predesigned rules. If the traffic qualifies as safe, it's allowed onto your network. If the traffic is questionable, the firewall blocks it and stops an attack before it enters your network. Just about anything in your broadcast facility should be behind a firewall if it is on your network, or going to be connected to the internet. Properly configure your firewall, make sure any software or firmware is up to date, and don't leave ports open.
• Equipment Passwords and Account Management.  Equipment in your station may come with a default password. You are urged to change default passwords on any equipment in your operation. If there are accounts or usernames on equipment that are default, or unused, you should also change or delete these. And remember, just because a system has a password, does not mean that it may be fully protected from access by other means. Equipment needs to be behind a firewall.
• Updates and Patches. The manufacturers of equipment in your station may contact you periodically regarding software patches and updates. Make it a practice of applying those software updates in a timely manner. Also, make it a practice of checking with your various manufacturers from time to time to see if they have released software updates of which you may not have been. These updates and patches may include not only feature improvements and bug fixes; they may also contain critical security patches.
• Secure Networks. Other measures to consider is a virtual private network (VPN). A VPN securely and inexpensively uses the public internet, instead of privately owned or leased lines, to provide remote sites and individuals with secure access to your organization's network. Consider, for example, a VPN link as part of the STL, if that relies on an IP stream from the studio to transmitter.
• Safe Web Browsing and E-Mail Habits. Very bad things can enter the station via email or suspect web sites. If your station's employees send e-mails and browse the internet (and of course, virtually all do!), you may also want to consider a software security solutions that include e-mail security, Web gateway security, and URL filtering.

The social solutions

• Security fundamentally involves a social aspect. Internally, you may need to reorient your employees and colleagues around safe email and web browsing habits. You may want to orient these employees to be wary of scam and phishing emails, and to beware of potentially dangerous attachments to emails from unknown or suspicious senders. You may need to reinforce safe web browsing habits, such as being careful not to download content from unknown or suspect websites.
• Broadcasters are a community. Externally, you may find opportunities to share information about what you are doing to improve security, what threats you see, and how you are addressing them.

When to call in an IT security consultant

There are going to be things you might not be able to do alone as a broadcaster. For FCC issues, you get outside legal advice. For annual and quarterly financials, you have an accountant. The same goes for security expertise. When you need to conduct a risk assessment, or get assistance in setting up network and IT security solutions, it may be money well spent it if you don't have the expertise to do it yourself.

Don't be part of the problem. Be part of the solution.

Nominations Committee Seeks Board Candidates
for 2017 Election
February 6, 2017
The annual election of officers and directors to the national SBE Board of Directors will take place this summer. The SBE Nominations Committee seeks qualified candidates who are voting members (Member, Senior, Fellow or the designated representative of a SBE Sustaining Member) in good standing (dues paid). Candidates must hold an engineering level of SBE certification (CBT or higher or CBNE) and maintain it the entire duration of service on the Board, if elected. Candidates should have a desire to serve and lead, not only as a member of the board, but through service as a national committee chair or member. Members of the Board represent all members, not any one specific region, state, city or chapter. It is suggested that candidates have previous experience as a leader in his or her local chapter, or other volunteer leadership experience, prior to running for the national SBE Board.

Members of the Board are expected to attend two regularly called meetings each year; in the spring, held during the annual NAB Show, and in the fall, at the annual SBE National Meeting. Other meetings may be called via conference call during the year.

The national SBE board includes 12 directors, four officers and the immediate past president. Directors serve two-year terms and officers serve one-year terms. Six director seats will be contested in 2017 as will all four officer positions. The SBE By-laws limits the number of terms of elected members of the Board. Directors may serve three consecutive terms. The secretary and treasurer may serve up to four consecutive terms and the president and vice president may serve up to two consecutive terms. The maximum number of years anyone may serve on the board is ten consecutive years. The time spent as immediate past president does not count towards the ten-year total.

Members interested in offering their candidacy and serving on the national Board if elected are encouraged to contact the SBE Nominations Committee Chair Jim Bernier, CPBE, CBNE, at jim.bernier@sbe.org or 678-466-0002. A slate of nominees will be assembled by the committee by April 28. Other qualified members may be nominated by members in good standing no later than July 10.

The election takes place from July 24 to Aug. 23. Candidates elected will be installed into office during the SBE National Meeting in Denver, CO, on Oct. 26.

Denver to Host SBE 2017 National Meeting
February 3, 2017

The Mile High City of Denver, CO, will host the 2017 SBE National Meeting on Oct. 25-26. SBE President Jerry Massey made the announcement at the end of the 2016 SBE Annual Membership Meeting held in Columbus, OH, last October. The National Meeting will be held in conjunction with Audio/Video Expo (AVX) at the Crowne Plaza Denver International Airport Hotel. The host chapter is Chapter 48 of Denver and the Colorado Front Range.

The SBE National Meeting includes the SBE Annual Membership Meeting, the SBE National Awards Reception and Dinner and the SBE Fellows Breakfast. Also meeting during the event will be the national SBE Board of Directors, and the national SBE Certification Committee.

The AVX is a two-day event that includes a trade show with more than 100 media and A/V oriented exhibiting companies, and two dozen workshops and seminars.

The Crowne Plaza DIA is a first class hotel that includes a 60,000 sq. ft convention center and offers free shuttle service to and from Denver International Airport. The SBE National Meeting was last held there in 2012.

More information about the SBE National Meeting will be available beginning in June. Watch for it in The Signal and SBE-news. All members and friends of the SBE are invited to attend. Members in Colorado and neighboring states are particularly encouraged to attend while the SBE National Meeting is close by. Save the dates: Oct. 25-26 for the 2017 SBE National Meeting and AVX.

SBE Leadership Development Course
Set for August

February 2, 2017

The Society of Broadcast Engineers will hold the 2017 SBE Leadership Development Course Aug. 8 - 10, 2017, in Atlanta, GA. This three-day course is an intensive study of successful leadership and management, designed specifically for broadcast engineers.

The course explores the nature of leadership, the difference between being a manager and being a leader, how to build a winning team, the importance of attitude in the leadership position, communication insights and so much more.

Rodney VandeveerInstructing the course for the seventh year will be Rodney Vandeveer, professor of Organizational Leadership and Supervision at Purdue University. Vandeveer brings more than 30 years of experience in human resources management, training, development and manufacturing. Vandeveer also owns a leadership training business, VanTech Training. A previous course attendee said, "Outstanding program! I found the material valuable, and Rodney [Vandeveer] is an engaging teacher!"

To register for this professional development opportunity, visit the Leadership Development Course page on the SBE website and click the Education tab. The enrollment fee is $620 for SBE members and $675 for non-members. The course will be held at the Hyatt Place Atlanta Airport South. A special room rate of $118 per night, plus tax, is available through July 10, 2017. Questions? Contact SBE Education Director Cathy Orosz at corosz@sbe.org.

The SBE has presented the SBE Leadership Development Course since 1997. The NAB sponsored the course from 1965 to 1995. This intense course is designed specifically for broadcast engineers who have or aspire to have management responsibilities. Details on the course are available at sbe.org/ldc.

SBE CertPreview™ 
certification exam preparation software
SBE
                              Cert Preview
SBE CertPreview sample certification test software is available. It's a downloadable version with features to help review your areas of knowledge. Sample tests are available for Broadcast Technologist, Audio Engineer, Video Engineer, Broadcast Networking Technologist, Broadcast Engineer and Senior Broadcast Engineer in both radio and television. Sample tests contain approximately 100 questions each. You can review and change answers prior to scoring the sample exam, and can revisit the questions within the sample exam after the scoring process. You can also see the results by topical category, which helps you identify strengths and weaknesses.. It provides a list of resources from which to learn more about a subject. 

The SBE CertPreview is a preparation for the following exams:

    * Certified Broadcast Technologist® (CBT) - Radio
    * Certified Broadcast Technologist® (CBT) - TV
    * Certified Broadcast Networking Technologist® (CBNT®)
    * Certified Audio Engineer® (CEA®)
    * Certified Video Engineer® (CEV®)
    * Certified Broadcast Radio Engineer (CBRE®) 
    * Certified Broadcast Television Engineer (CBTE®)
    * Certified Senior Radio Engineer (CSRE®)
    * Certified Senior Television Engineer (CSTE®)
    * AM Directional Specialist™ (AMD™)
    * 8-VSB Specialist (8-VSB) ™
    * Digital Radio Broadcast Specialist™ (DRB™)

 Cost for each SBE CERTpreview practice test is $32 for the download version or $36 plus $3 shipping for the CD. To order a copy, visit

https://www.sbe.org/certpreview/index.php.

CERTIFICATION EXAMS
Certification exam session dates for 2016/17 are listed below.  Check the list for the exam period that is best for you.  For more information about SBE Certification, contact Chapter Certification Chair Rick Ryan at (414) 305-9374 or RickRyan@wi.rr.com, or contact Megan Clappe, Certification Director at the SBE National Office at (317) 846-9000 or MClappe@sbe.org.
Exam Dates
Location
Application Deadline
Aug 4-14, 2017 Local Chapter Past
Nov 3-13, 2017 Local Chapter Sept 25, 2017

Fees for 2016 are as follows:  
Certification Level
Member
Non-Member
Radio Operator
$54
*$54
TV Operator $54 *$54
Broadcast Technologist $53 $135
Broadcast Networking Technologist
$62
$144
Audio/Video Engineer
$67
$149
Broadcast Engineer $67
$149
Broadcast Networking Engineer $80 $162
Senior Broadcast Engineer
$92
$174
Professional Broadcast Engineer
$117
$199
Specialist Certification

AM Directional Specialist
$62
$144
8VSB Specialist
$62
$144
Digital Radio Broadcast Specialist $62 $144

*Does not include first year membership

Please support our sustaining members

Chuck Janzer
David Janzer
Associated Technical Services
10010 W Schlinger Avenue
Milwaukee, WI 53214-1129
414-476-4200
414-476-8417 fax
cjanzer@atswi.com
djanzer@atswi.com
http://www.atswi.com

David Kerstin
Broadcasters General Store
3840 SW N Street
Richmond, IN 47374
765-935-6707
765-935-6158 fax
dave@bgs.cc
http://www.bgs.cc/

GEPCO International
a General Cable company
1770 Birchwood Avenue
Des Plaines, IL 60018
847-942-7990 (cell)
http://www.GEPCO.com/

Dennis Klas
Heartland Video Systems
1311 Pilgrim Road 
Plymouth, WI  53073
800-332-7088
920-893-4204
920-893-3106 fax
dklas@hvs-inc.com
http://www.hvs-inc.com

 
IBEW Local 715 
Wisconsin Broadcast Engineers
633 S Hawley Road, Suite 107
Milwaukee, WI 53214-1948
414-479-0580
414-479-0582 fax

Randy Ross
Industrial Electronics
by Ross 
3256 S 92nd St, 
West Allis, WI 53227
414-327-1555
414-327-0577 fax
indelect@execpc.com
http://www.industrialelectronics.biz/

David R. Pritchard
Pritchard Consulting
7583 Dada Drive 
Gurnee, IL 60031 
847- 207-6111
W9QL@att.net

Tony Coleman
Hearst Television, Inc.
WISN-TV
759 N 19th Street
Milwaukee, WI 53233
414-937-3375
414-342-2657 fax
tcoleman@hearst.com
http://www.wisn.com

Sinclair Broadcast Group 
WVTV/WCGV
11520 W Calumet Rd
Milwaukee, WI 53224

414-815-4100
414-815-4103 fax


Society of Broadcast Engineers, Inc.
9102 North Meridian Street, Suite 150
Indianapolis, IN 46260
Phone: (317) 846-9000
Fax: (317) 846-9120
http://www.sbe.org

Edited by volunteer members of SBE Chapter 28, Milwaukee, WI.  Opinions expressed do not necessarily represent the SBE or Chapter 28.  Material for publication may be submitted electronically to Newsletter@sbe28.org.  Reprint permission granted to other SBE Chapters.  Please credit this newsletter and original source if indicated.
copyright © 2002-2017 SBE Chapter 28-Milwaukee, WI
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